EQ Meets TEDx at the International School at the Hague

Sukai- TEDxHow often do teens think before acting? You likely remember the time when you wish your younger self had stopped to think before taking your parent’s car out for a spin or having an angry outburst you later regretted. It is well known that the frontal lobe, the part of the brain that controls executive functions such as decision-making, does not finish connecting its neural pathways until the late teens/early twenties. Six Seconds has a model that can help young brains apply the pause button before acting out of strong emotions.

One person keen on helping youth learn the skills of consequential thinking is Sukai Ceesay. Certified by Six Seconds in EQ coaching , she is the founder of Global Village Children, a nonprofit based in Den Haag, The Netherlands whose mission is helping schools integrate emotional intelligence into their traditional curriculum. On June 9th, she gave a workshop at TEDx Youth at the International School at the Hague on applying consequential thinking for 10-15 year olds.

TEDx Closing ThanksThe workshop, aimed at ages 10-18, was part of a day-long event at the International School at the Hague (ISH) which explored ideas of creativity, skills and ideas for empowering youth in the 21st century based on the Six Seconds model of emotional intelligence. What greater empowerment can there be for youth than navigating their turbulent emotional waters using emotional intelligence (EQ)?

EQ is learnable and teachable, and when properly developed, individuals have increased awareness of their own tendencies and how to use it in the right moments.

Consequential Thinking is one of the competencies of emotional intelligence that helps evaluate the cost and benefit of one’s choices. Teens can learn to pause and evaluate their feelings, and what might happen as a result of their actions. For example, if I “borrow” my parents’ car without permission, I might hurt someone or lose my license. Is it worth it? Does it match my noble goal?

Think, Feel, and Act are 3 pillars of consequential thinking

In the workshop, Sukai guided participants to interact with Think, Feel, Act (TFA) activity cards from Six SecondTFACardss. Through games, she also taught some social and life skills necessary at this maturity level from GVC’s new Global Citizen Education Program. One 15-year- old A student saw his patterns and challenges after the TFA engagement and shared how eye-opening it was “because I am always a logical and practical person and now I can see how I have been following the same pattern in difficult conversations!” The workshop was attended by parents, students, staff, guests from the International Baccalaureate Association, . and HR/Talent development professionals.

 

 

 

What is required of me? Why is it necessary? How do I feel about it? What are the best possible ways to get it done?

TEDx Youth-ISHSix Seconds has a goal of 1 billion people practicing EQ by 2039 and workshops like this are a key component in expanding the practice of EQ globally. EQ adds value to the lives of the participants as well as those they touch, but to spread it effectively, participants need to understand the concept of EQ and how to use it daily.

For Sukai Ceesay, the takeaway is simple: “At any given time, at a moment of choice when you need to act, ask your self these questions… What is required of me? Why is it necessary? How do I feel about it? What are the best possible ways to get it done? What is the impact? Is it worth it? This will allow you to engage your whole brain and you will get to an emotionally intelligent decision.”

 

sukaiAbout Sukai Ceesay, founder, Global Village Children.

GVC’s founder was born in The Gambia, West Africa, is an American, and Dutch resident. Sukai describes herself to everyone she knows as a “citizen of the world”. She gained world views from an international education background and literally by travelling the world. As a young adult, she moved to the United States, where she finished high school and attended Eastern Michigan University (EMU) where she studied Urban Design and Planning for her Bachelor’s degree. She did a bridge study for her Master’s degree with EMU and The University of Michigan in Industrial Engineering, and then gained business acumen at Harvard Business School during her Executive MBA. She credits her better awareness of the world to her childhood fascination with human interactions, a thirst for learning, and travelling. Eventually, this passion lead her to become a certified EQ professional trainer. She recently started a training group with 3 EQ experts called EQ Smart Politics- bringing EQ to World Leaders .

About Global Village Children:

A unique, non-pgreen-globe-handsrofit organization, Global Village Children (GVC) is a pioneer for EQ development by helping schools integrate EI into their traditional curriculum for ages 3-18 years. With the mission of Global Citizen preparedness in mind, GVC combines pivotal findings from science and research thereby infusing an important balance in the educational and emotional development of children. The organization goes beyond just providing an EQ curriculum.

GVC plays a key role in personally training staff, preparing parents in EQ development workshops for the home,  and carefully overseeing the smooth integration of the program’s deployment at schools and communities where kids grow…around the world, with current programs in the United States, The Netherlands and India. 

 

Rachel Goodman

Rachel Goodman

Peabody Award-winning broadcaster and communications professional, editor, producer, and writer for effective outcomes. Ms. Goodman has been a radio producer for much of her career, specializing in short features and documentaries. Some of her work includes Southern Songbirds: the Women of Early Country Music, Pastures of Plenty: A History of California's Farmworkers, and The Boomtown Chronicles: Reflections on a Changing California. Ms. Goodman teaches journalism at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz County. Her goals are to facilitate positive change in the world through effective communication, and to continue conducting her work with the highest level of integrity possible.
Rachel Goodman